Inglês Todos os Dias #43: Este é um avião de verdade?!

18 comments Written on June 10th, 2015 by
Categories: Inglês Todos os Dias, Podcasts
Inglês Todos os Dias #43: Este é um avião de verdade?!
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Este é um avião de verdade?! Foi isso que meu sobrinho perguntou para o piloto quando ele entrou na cabine. Aprenda a dizer "de verdade" em inglês no mini-podcast de hoje.





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Frases no mini podcast de hoje:

When we were boarding the plane...
Is this a real plane?
Yes, it is. Do you want to sit in my seat?
These are real flowers.
This is real gold.



Show me a picture os something "real" (de verdade) and write: This is a real ____________ .

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18 comments “Inglês Todos os Dias #43: Este é um avião de verdade?!”

e para dizer: “na verdade, isso não é um um animal de verdade.”

“Actually, that is not a real animal.”

Be careful, this is a not a plush dog (Tim, please, is correct to translate “cachorro de pelúcia” as plush dog?), it is a real dog.

That is correct, José Luiz.

Hi Tim! I don’t have a picture.
A few days ago, my husband asked me in Portuguese something like that: “Is this a real English Class?”  
I was listening to one of your podcasts!

And what did you reply, Irene? 🙂

Is this a real city? Take a look at

I don’t think so. Is it?

Tim Barret. This is a real ENGLISH MASTER… Hey Tim, I have a question; why is a “Corretor de imóveis” (in Brazil, of course) called a “Real state agent” in english? Thank you, Tim! See you!

Thanks, Daniel! About your question, it’s a little complicated, but this answer might help:

The real in real estate (AmE) or real property (BrE) is archaic, meaning of actual or physical things. Real estate is physical property, land and things fixed to the land such as buildings. In contrast, personal property, such as tools or clothing, is not fixed to the land. The Latin root is res, which is generally translated as things.

The alternative theory that the root is rex, i.e. king (from which through various intermediary languages we get royal, regnal, realm, regalia, and so on) does get a lengthy writeup in Wikipedia, however.

From http://

   So this word could come from “royalty”?ahahahaha This is a REAL COMPLICATED EXPLANATION! I’m sorry, I’m just kidding!

Yes, that’s a possibility! And, you’re right, it IS complicated! 🙂

Ok Tim! Thanks for your explanation on “Real estate agent”; see you! 🙂

Thanks Tim!!!

Tim,  I Want to Speak Real English!

And you’re doing a good job at it, Paulo!

My dog thought that the mouse is real.

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