Independence Day in the United States [Video & Script]

9 comments Written on July 8th, 2011 by
Categories: Videos & Scripts
Independence Day in the United States [Video & Script]
Yesterday was Independence Day in the United States. Find out why we celebrate Independence Day on July 4th in the United States, while you learn a lot of interesting expressions and phrasal verbs, too.

Ontem foi o Dia da Independência nos Estados Unidos. Descubra porque celebramos o Dia da Independência no dia 4 de julho, enquanto aprende muitas expressões e phrasal verbs interessanes, também.

1. Watch this interesting BrainPop video about the declaration of independence.

Assista o ví­deo e leia a tradução dos termos abaixo.


http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/ushistory/declarationofindependence/

Hint: If you click on the button "cc", you can read the "closed captions" while you watch the video.

  • closed captions = também conhecido como "subtitles" = legendas

2. Fill in the blanks. Below you can check your answers and read explanations/translations of all the difficult terms and phrasal verbs.

  • fill in the blanks = preencher as lacunas
  • below = abaixo
DICA: Clique no primeiro botão "Imprima com PrintFriendly" no começo deste texto onde diz "Share the Knowledge" para gerar uma formatação mais simples para impressão. Você também poderá selecionar quais partes do texto você quer imprimir ou não.

Okay, you go around the back of the house and create a distraction. [--Beep.] What? [--Beep.] I am not being _________ ! [--Beep.] Yes, I know you don’t have to do what I say. [Dear Tim & Moby, What was the Declaration of Independence all about?] Hey, let’s take a break. The Declaration of Independence was just that: In 1776, the 13 American colonies declared they were going to form a new country totally independent, or separate, from Great Britain. [--Beep.] Well, up until that time, Great Britain had _________ the colonies, even though they were all the way across the ocean. It made a lot of sense at first, maybe, but the colonies developed their own _________, and they had a lot of disagreements with their British rulers. In 1774, representatives from 12 of the 13 colonies met in the First Continental Congress. They wrote a declaration of rights and grievances and addressed it to the King of England. But King George III was angry – he considered the Continental Congress to be _________. In 1775, British and American troops _________ ________ in battles at Lexington and Concord. Later that year the Second Continental Congress met to decide what to do next. A lot of colonists were still against declaring independence from England. Then in January of 1776, Thomas Paine’s pamphlet, Common Sense, ________ _______. He argued that since the colonies got nothing out of their relationship with England, it was common sense to become independent. His forceful argument ________ _______a lot of people. In June of 1776, a declaration committee of the Second Continental Congress drafted a statement of independence from Britain. The declaration committee included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston. Jefferson was chosen to write the ________ ________ . He divided the Declaration into three main parts. The first part ________ _______basic human rights: “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” and “all men created equal.” Jefferson also included the right of the people to revolt against bad governments. The second part was a list of grievances, or _________, against King George III. The third part of the Declaration was a formal statement of independence. John Adams and Ben Franklin made a few minor edits to Jefferson’s draft, but _________ they were pretty happy with it. The Continental Congress _________ the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. [--Beep.] Yeah, that’s why we celebrate Independence Day on July 4th. On August 2nd, 1776, most of the delegates of the Continental Congress formally _________ an official copy of the Declaration. Okay, I think we’ve finally got enough ammo. [--Beep.] You’re revolting? Against me?! Uh-oh. <Splash!>

3. Take the BrainPop quiz with questions about the video.


http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/ushistory/declarationofindependence/quiz/

4. The Declaration of Independence from Brain Pop (Script & Explanations / Translations)

Okay, you go around the back of the house and create a distraction. [--Beep.] What? [--Beep.] I am not being bossy! [--Beep.] Yes, I know you don’t have to do what I say. [Dear Tim & Moby, What was the Declaration of Independence all about?] Hey, let’s take a break.

The Declaration of Independence was just that: In 1776, the 13 American colonies declared they were going to form a new country totally independent, or separate, from Great Britain. [--Beep.] Well, up until that time, Great Britain had ruled the colonies, even though they were all the way across the ocean. It made a lot of sense at first, maybe, but the colonies developed their own identity, and they had a lot of disagreements with their British rulers.

  • was just that = foi justamente isso
  • up until that time = até então
  • even though = mesmo que
  • all the way across the ocean = no outro lado do oceano [“all the way” é para enfatizar a distância]
  • made a lot of sense = fez muito sentido
  • at first = inicialmente
  • developed = desenvolveram
  • disagreements = divergências

In 1774, representatives from 12 of the 13 colonies met in the First Continental Congress. They wrote a declaration of rights and grievances and addressed it to the King of England. But King George III was angry – he considered the Continental Congress to be traitors. In 1775, British and American troops faced off in battles at Lexington and Concord. Later that year the Second Continental Congress met to decide what to do next. A lot of colonists were still against declaring independence from England.

Then in January of 1776, Thomas Paine’s pamphlet, Common Sense, came out. He argued that since the colonies got nothing out of their relationship with England, it was common sense to become independent. His forceful argument won over a lot of people.

  • came out = saiu (foi publicado)
  • argued = argumentou
  • since = desde que
  • got nothing out of, phrasal verb = não tiraram proveito/levaram vantagem nenhuma
  • common sense = bom senso
  • forceful argument = argument forte
  • win over, phrasal verb = convencer/persuadir a concordar com a sua causa

In June of 1776, a declaration committee of the Second Continental Congress drafted a statement of independence from Britain. The declaration committee included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston. Jefferson was chosen to write the first draft. He divided the Declaration into three main parts. The first part laid out basic human rights: “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” and “all men created equal.” Jefferson also included the right of the people to revolt against bad governments. The second part was a list of grievances, or complaints, against King George III. The third part of the Declaration was a formal statement of independence. John Adams and Ben Franklin made a few minor edits to Jefferson’s draft, but overall they were pretty happy with it.

  • drafted = redigiram
  • statement = declaração
  • first draft = primeira versão/rascunho
  • main parts = partes principais
  • laid out = expôs
  • revolt = revoltar-se
  • grievances = queixas
  • complaints = reclamações
  • minor = pequenas (mudanças)
  • overall = em geral

The Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. [--Beep.] Yeah, that’s why we celebrate Independence Day on July 4th. On August 2nd, 1776, most of the delegates of the Continental Congress formally signed an official copy of the Declaration. Okay, I think we’ve finally got enough ammo. [--Beep.] You’re revolting? Against me?! Uh-oh. <Splash!>

  • adopted = adotaram
  • that’s why = é por isso que
  • delegates = representantes
  • signed = assinaram
  • got enough ammo = temos munição suficiente

Source: http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/ushistory/declarationofindependence/
Texto e traduções de termos para o português – www.domineingles.com.br

5. Declare your own independence! Master phrasal verbs and many other everyday expressions in English!


Domine Centenas de Phrasal Verbs e Expressões do Dia a Dia em Inglês
http://www.domineingles.com.br/products-page/ <== Clique aqui

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9 comments “Independence Day in the United States [Video & Script]”

Great Job, Guys….Keep up the good work.
God may bless you all.

Thanks, Vagner!

Hello Tim, I’ve been trying to follow one tip you’ve given us a long time ago, I remeber you wrote about writting our tips down either in a notepad or another kind of material. So, I’ve been taking notes on paper and I believe it is generating results.. well, this tip about “all about” it is very good, I had read when you posted, but I had not written down and I didn’t pay attention at that time, yesterday all of sudden came across this expression and I could remember about you, so I now I’m taking notes and I’m sure from now on I’ll not forget anymore. Thank you for your tips, man, God bless you!

Thanks for writing, Evandro! It's always a good idea to write new phrases down and review them from time to time. Good for you! Keep up the good work!