Como Barack Obama e Mitt Romney Se Saíram no Debate [Phrasal Verb: Come Across As]

Como Barack Obama e Mitt Romney Se Saíram no Debate [Phrasal Verb: Come Across As]

After the debates, I always enjoy watching the political pundits talk about who won the debate and how it affected the elections. One word the commentators use a lot to describe the people’s impressions of the candidates is the phrasal verb “come across”. See how this important phrasal verb is used below.

Depois dos debates, sempre gosto de assistir os comentaristas políticos discutindo quem ganhou o debate e como isso afetou as eleições. Uma palavra que os especialistas usam bastante para descrever a impressão que as pessoas tiveram dos candidatos é o phrasal verb come across. Veja abaixo como esse importante phrasal verb é usado.


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FILL IN THE BLANKS (then see script with explanations below).

Hi, it’s Tim Barrett here from domineingles.com.br. Tonight is the third and final presidential debate in the United States elections.  And I always enjoy watching those debates. And then after the debates, I really enjoy watching the political _______ talk about who won and who said what and who had the best argument here or there. And one word they use a lot to describe the people’s _______ of the candidates is the phrasal verb “come across”. Let’s look at these comments from the last debate and you’ll see what I’m talking about.

Sarah Palin: What you’re going to see as a result of that is the _______  media tomorrow morning will probably want to give a quote-unquote “win” to Joe Biden based on style; because Joe Biden _______ _______ _____quite passionate, having used rhetoric like you just mentioned… I honestly think that at this stage of the race people are not so obsessed with who’s going to _______ _______ _____ more telegenic or more passionate based on the words or terminology that they used, but what is the _______ – what’s behind their beliefs, their policies, what is their own record.

Host: I saw a comment from you. I’ll _______  you to say it. What did you think of last [night’s debate]?

Huckabee: Well, I thought that Joe Biden _______ _______ ______  a guy that you meet at a cocktail party or some political event – an obnoxious drunk who’s loud and boisterous and interrupts every conversation. He just is the kind of guy you want to _______  _______  ______  as quickly as you can and go find someone else to talk to.

McCain: Well, I was surprised at how well Mitt did; and I think it was very important because he _______  _______  ______  the person he really is, as opposed to how he has been portrayed by hundreds of millions of dollars of attack ads; and, obviously, I was surprised at the president’s poor _______  .

So what does the phrasal verb “come across” mean? You should have already learned that phrasal verb in our third story in our series “Phrasal Verbs and Everyday Expressions”, The Abominable Adorable Snowman”. Let’s refresh our memory.

Yeti: Hey, I never try to scare people.
Tammy: Then why do you _______  _______  ______  being an ABOMINABLE snow creature.
Yeti: I don’t know. People like to _______ _____ stories, I guess.

I also taught you this phrasal verb some time ago on our old site when I said that our friend Ulisses from teclasap.com.br had just been interviewed by Jô Soares, and I sent him a comment like this:  I thought that, during the interview, you _______  _______  _____ very human (in the good sense) and friendly. People admire someone who has the ability to _______  at himself sometimes. You seemed very much relaxed and in control! Great job! I continue to wish you all the best!"

So what does come across mean? Come across means to give other people a certain impression or feeling or opinion of you. In Portuguese, it would be similar to saying that someone “dá a impressão de ser” or “passa a impressão de ser”.

So what do I come across as? If it’s something positive, tell me about it on our site; ok? I’ll see you there! Bye bye!


SCRIPT WITH TRANSLATIONS AND EXPLANATIONS
Hi, it’s Tim Barrett here from domineingles.com.br. Tonight is the third and final presidential debate in the United States elections.  And I always enjoy watching those debates. And then after the debates, I really enjoy watching the political pundits talk about who won and who said what and who had the best argument here or there. And one word they use a lot to describe the people’s impressions of the candidates is the phrasal verb “come across”. Let’s look at these comments from the last debate and you’ll see what I’m talking about.

  • i enjoy watching… = eu gosto de assistir…
  • political pundits = comentaristas/especialistas políticos
  • who won = quem ganhou
  • who said what = quem disse o quê
  • best arguments = melhores argumentos
  • one word they use to describe the people’s impressions of the candidates = uma palavra que usam para descrever as impressões que pessoas têm sobre os candidatos

Sarah Palin: What you’re going to see as a result of that is the main-stream media tomorrow morning will probably want to give a quote-unquote “win” to Joe Biden based on style; because Joe Biden came across as quite passionate, having used rhetoric like you just mentioned… I honestly think that at this stage of the race people are not so obsessed with who’s going to come across as more telegenic or more passionate based on the words or terminology that they used, but what is the substance – what’s behind their beliefs, their policies, what is their own record.

  • what you’re going to see = o que você verá
  • as a result of that = como resultado disso
  • the main-stream media = a grande mídia, mídia em massa
  • quote-unquote = entre aspas
O que significa o phrasal verb 'come across (as/like) Como se diz “come across as" em português? Qual é a tradução de "come across as"? What does "come across as" mean? What is the meaning of "come across as"?

  • come across as/like = parecer / dar a impressão de ser / passar a impressão de ser

  • quite passionate = um tanto entusiasmado
  • having used rhetoric = tendo usado retórica
  • like you just mentioned = como você acabou de mencionar
  • I honestly think that = sinceramente acho que
  • at this stage of the race = nesse ponto da corrida (presidencial)
  • what is the substance = qual é o conteúdo
  • what’s behind their beliefs = qual é a base da crença deles
  • their policies = suas políticas
  • what is their own record = qual é o próprio passado/registro (político) deles

Host: I saw a comment from you. I’ll allow you to say it. What did you think of last [night’s debate]?

Huckabee: Well, I thought that Joe Biden came across like a guy that you meet at a cocktail party or some political event – an obnoxious drunk who’s loud and boisterous and interrupts every conversation. He just is the kind of guy you want to get away from as quickly as you can and go find someone else to talk to.

  • I’ll allow you to say it = vou permitir que você o diga
  • a guy that you meet at a cocktail party = um cara que você conhece em um coquetel / em uma festa
  • an obnoxious drunk = um bêbado desagradável/chato
  • boisterous = que fala alto e é rude
  • the kind of guy you want to get away from = o tipo de cara que de quem você quer se afastar / de quem você quer ficar longe
  • as quickly as you can = o mais rápido possível
  • and go find someone else to talk to = e ir achar outra pessoa com quem conversar

McCain: Well, I was surprised at how well Mitt did; and I think it was very important because he came across as the person he really is, as opposed to how he has been portrayed by hundreds of millions of dollars of attack ads; and, obviously, I was surprised at the president’s poor performance.

  • I was surprised at how well Mitt did = fiquei surpreso (de ver) como o Mitt se saiu bem
  • as the person he really is = a pessoa que ele realmente é
  • as opposed to = ao contrário de
  • how he has been portrayed = como ele foi retratado
  • attack ads = propaganda (negativa) de ataque
  • i was surprised at the president’s poor performance = fiquei surpreso com o mau desempenho do presidente

So what does the phrasal verb “come across” mean? You should have already learned that phrasal verb in our third story in our series “Phrasal Verbs and Everyday Expressions”, The Abominable Adorable Snowman”. Let’s refresh our memory.

  • you should have already learned it = você já deveria ter aprendido
  • in our third story = em nossa terceira história
  • refresh our memory = refrescar nossa memória

Yeti: Hey, I never try to scare people.
Tammy: Then why do you come across as being an ABOMINABLE snow creature.
Yeti: I don’t know. People like to make up stories, I guess.

  • I never try to scare people = eu nunca tento assustar as pessoas
  • why do you come across as being an ABOMINABLE snow creature? = porque você dá a impressão de ser uma ABOMINÁVEL criatura da neve?
  • people like to make up stories = pessoas gostam de inventar histórias

I also taught you this phrasal verb some time ago on our old site when I said that our friend Ulisses from teclasap.com.br had just been interviewed by Jô Soares, and I sent him a comment like this:  I thought that, during the interview, you came across as very human (in the good sense) and friendly. People admire someone who has the ability to laugh at himself sometimes. You seemed very much relaxed and in control! Great job! I continue to wish you all the best!"

  • he had just been interviewed = ele acabou de ser entrevistado
  • i sent him a comment = enviei-lhe um comentário
  • like this = assim
  • human = nesse sentido, “human” é uma forma de dizer que uma pessoa mostra-se simpática e acessível ==> friendly = amigável, simpático
  • people admire someone who has the ability to laugh at himself = pessoas admiram alguém que consegue rir de si mesmo

So what does come across mean? Come across means to give other people a certain impression or feeling or opinion of you. In Portuguese, it would be similar to saying that someone “dá a impressão de ser” or “passa a impressão de ser”.

So what do I come across as? If it’s something positive, tell me about it on our site; ok? I’ll see you there! Bye bye!

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8 comments “Como Barack Obama e Mitt Romney Se Saíram no Debate [Phrasal Verb: Come Across As]”

Hey Tim! What’s up? I really liked your post, and I have a question. I’ve always learned that come across it’s like “meet by chance”. Is this “as” that we put after the “come across” that change the meaning? Thanks!

Yes, that’s correct, Fernando! That’s why it is so important to learn phrasal verbs *in their contexts*! Thank you for your comment!

My comment is about “People admire someone who has the ability to laugh at himself”. If you say:”People admire self deprecating jokes”, would that be the same?
Anyways, great article!!
txs 😀

Yes, that would have a similar meaning, Vagner. Although, I am not so sure he told a self deprecating joke, per se; he was just laughing at himself and mistakes he made when learning English.

Hi Tim,

You not only come across as a great teacher; you are a great teacher. I just loved this post and video. I’m looking forward to reading the next one.

Take care!

Thank you so much for your kind words, Alessandro! I really appreciate it! It means a lot comming from a great blogger (www.englishexperts.com.br) and English teacher such as yourself! Best wishes to you always!

Hi, Tim:

It never crossed my mind that “come across” could have another meaning! As mentioned above, this Phrasal Verb used to be translated as “meeting someone by chance” (at least by me). But according to your video and comments, there’s something here I just couldn’t help but see how different a context can be. We are introduced to “as” and “like”. I believe they’re prepositions. So, maybe that’s why “come across” changes its meaning.

Example:

Last week I went downtown when I came across my friend Paul. Oh, by the way, he usually comes across like an outgoing guy. Someone you can hang out and have some fun with.

Can you see? “Come across” and “come across as/like” have different meanings.

Also, when I watched your first video (sent me by e-mail), you came across as being a shy guy. Maybe someone who keeps a low profile. Please, there’s nothing wrong with it once first impressions are not always what stick. You’re a great teacher and human being! Somehow you make us feel special. I like that.

Elections in US? I had no time to watch the news owing to work. Anyway, I heard Mr. Obama has been quite worried about that terrible hurricane Sandy. May God bless and take good care of American citizens…

Thank you for your interesting comments, Fábio! Yes, you’re totally right. The context says everything – especially when dealing with phrasal verbs! And, yes, you “read me” right. 🙂 I am shy – especially on video. hahaha People who know me personally don’t think I am, but I fool them most of the time. 😉

Thanks again for writing!


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